Sie sind hier: Startseite Abstracts The Narratives of Conversions in the Acts of the Apostles in the Exegetical Writings of John Chrysostom

The Narratives of Conversions in the Acts of the Apostles in the Exegetical Writings of John Chrysostom

The narratives of conversions in the Acts of Apostles have great religious and theological interest in the exegetical writings of John Chrysostom. As the Acts is considered not only as a major account of the early history of the Christian church but also as a book recording conversions to Christ, the reception of them through the theological lens of Chrysostom has an important influence in the human anthropological perspective of eastern Christian thought.

Apart from his dealing with the general statements of conversion (Acts 2:41; 8:5,12 et.al.), he approaches the following seven episodes: (a) The eunuch from Ethiopia as the first of the Gentiles to be converted to Christianity (8:26-40). (b) The call of Saul, i.e. how the persecutor Saul is transformed by the risen Christ and became not only a witness to Jesus Christ but also the hero of the second half of Acts (9:1-19a; 22:6-16; 26:12-18). (c) The conversion of Cornelius and his household in Caesarea (10:1-11:18). (d) How Lydia is converted to Christianity (16:13-15). (e) The conversion of the Roman warden (16:25-34). (f) The conversion of Dionysius of the Areopagus and Damaris (17:34). And (g) the conversion of Crispus, the leader of Synagogue (18:8). 

Artikelaktionen