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G_NET and ESITIS Logos

The European Society for Intercultural Theology and Interreligious Studies (ESITIS) is an integral partner for G_NET. On 25 March 2021 ESITIS and G_NET will host a free webinar looking at the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on interreligious relationships, on religious observance and ritual, and on religious communities in relation to issues of race. For more information and to register click here.

In 2022, ESITIS will hold its bi-annual conference on the topic of “Sacred Protest: Religion, Power, and Resistance in an Era of Upheaval” in Bonn. Analysis of the complex interrelations of religion and modern protest movements highlights pervasive anxieties that then are taken up in religious discourses. Religion and protest converge and diverge and in pursuit of various ends, making careful analysis of religion and protest, as a prototypical manifestation of transcultural pressures, necessary. 1. Which religious actors protest, when, why and how? 2. Which traditional resources are called upon in the service of or resistance to protest? 3. Where do conditions for trans-religious cooperation or horizontal solidarity appear and why? 4. And how are protest and religion to be studied, with which methods, and at what level of involvement? 5. What are the values, emotions and possibilities for renewal in religiously motivated or censored protest?

Project Partners: Dr. Matthew Ryan Robinson (Protestant Theological Faculty, RFW University of Bonn); Dr. Ikenna Paschal Okpaleke (Institut für Hermeneutik, Protestant Theological Faculty, RFW University of Bonn); Prof. Dr. Yaser Ellethy (Vrije Universität Amsterdam); ESITIS

 

The Neighbor Seminar: Politics, Practice, Person (Summer Sem. 2021)

Under the motto “How we see others produces the society we see”, the seminar will examine resources and liabilities in the Christian and Muslim traditions concerning exclusion and inclusion of strangers enemies, and forgotten members of society from critical perspectives in contextual theology, postcolonial theology, and political theology. The seminar will focus on discourses and practices of loving the neighbor and enemy as well as the political significance of theo-logics of the neighbor for the fostering of democratic culture, which depends on seeing and treating others as equals under the law. Co-taught by scholars from three different continents and academic contexts, the seminar will interrelate exegetical, philosophical-hermeneutical, social-scientific, and ethical methods. In this way, it will offer an innovative approach to a topic of major transcultural importance.

Project Partners: Dr. Matthew Ryan Robinson (Protestant Theological Faculty, RFW University of Bonn); Prof. Dr. Yaser Ellethy (Vrije Universität Amsterdam); Prof. Dr. Rose Mary Amenga Etego (University of Ghana); Dean Prof. Dr. David Joy (Kerala Theological Seminary Rivandrum); Dr. Andrew D. DeCort (Institute for Faith and Flourishing, Ethiopia)

 

What Does Theology Do, Actually? WDTD Logo

What Does Theology Do, Actually? is a symposium and book series devoted to transcultural and transdisciplinary analysis of evolving forms and functions of the traditional Christian-theological disciplines. Central to the purposes of the What Does Theology Do, Actually? series is to observe, document, and describe the functions of theological knowledge production and communication as that knowledge/those communications are experienced, cultivated, and used in varying knowledge production contexts. WDTD seeks not to do theology but to observe what theology does. 

What Does Theology Do, Actually? Part II is being devoted to the field of Exegesis. Exegesis has long been characterized by a broad disciplinary diversity, but also ambiguity, combining biblical studies, exegesis, early Jewish studies, early Christian studies, Ancient Near Eastern studies, Greco-Roman and classical studies in various ways. This is to say nothing of the more recent development of contextual and engaged exegesis as reflected in feminist, liberation, postcolonial and queer Biblical exegesis. How and why scholars study the Bible varies, not only across confessional or cultural contexts, but across institutional-academic contexts. On 9-10 July 2021, the second WDTD symposium will not seek to evaluate or resolve this ambiguity but will approach it diagonally via sociological questions about the interrelations of context, institutions, and knowledge production. 

For more information and to register click here.

Project Partners: Dr. Matthew Ryan Robinson (Protestant Theological Faculty, RFW University of Bonn); Dr. Philipp Drew Davis (Protestant Theological Faculty, RFW University of Bonn); Dr. Daniel Lanzinger (Catholic Theological Faculty, RFW University of Bonn); Dean Prof. Dr. David Joy (Kerala Theological Seminary Rivandrum)

 

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